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Invicta Men's 7044 Signature Collection Pro Diver Automatic Watch [Watch] Inv...

  • $ 129.99


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Designed for serious divers, the Invicta Men's Signature Collection Pro Diver Automatic Watch features luminous hour markers and a black and red bezel to help you keep track of your underwater explorations. Constructed with a stainless steel case, the watch includes a unidirectional stainless steel bezel and a stainless steel link wristband that's secured with a fold-over safety clasp. A scratch-resistant sapphire window shields the white dial, which features bold, luminous hour markers, slim minute indexes, and Arabic numerals in five-minute increments. The dial also includes a day-and-date calendar at the three o'clock position. Featuring Japanese-automatic movement, this sporty timepiece is water resistant to 660 feet (200 m).

Screw Down Crowns: Many Invicta watches are equipped with a screw down crown to help prevent water infiltration. This is most common on our Diver models. In order to adjust the date and/or time on such a watch, you must first unscrew the crown before you can gently pull it out to its first or second click stop position. To do this, simply rotate the crown counterclockwise until it springs open. When you have finished setting the watch, the crown must then be pushed in and screwed back in tightly. Not doing so will cancel the water resistance of the watch and will void all warranties from the manufacturer. Overall, this process should not require a lot of effort or force.

Automatic Watches

Automatic watches do not operate on batteries. Automatic watches are made up of about 130 or more parts that work together to tell time. Automatic movements mark the passage of time by a series of gear mechanisms, and are wound by the movement of your wrist as you wear it. The gear train then transmits the power to the escapement, which distributes the impulses, turning the balance wheel. The balance wheel is the time regulating organ of a mechanical watch, which vibrates on a spiral hairspring. Lengthening or shortening the balance spring makes the balance wheel go faster or slower to advance or retard the watch. The travel of the balance wheel from one extreme to the other and back again is called oscillation. Lastly, automatic movements come in different types, including movements that are Swiss-made, Japanese-made, and more.

Also referred to as self-winding, watches with automatic movements utilize kinetic energy, the swinging of your arm, to provide energy to an oscillating rotor to keep the watch ticking. They're considered more satisfying to watch collectors (horologists) because of the engineering artistry that goes into the hundreds of parts that make up the movement. If you do not wear an automatic watch consistently (for about 8 to 12 hours a day), you can keep the watch powered with a watch winder (a great gift for collectors).




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